Singapore Heritage Festival Takes Over (Caldecott)!

Singapore Heritage Festival Takes Over (Caldecott)!

Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 – on its 14th edition – has launched the SHF Takes Over! programme to plentiful fanfare. The inaugural programme kicks off by taking festival goers to Caldecott Broadcast Centre, the heart of Singapore’s broadcast history where local radio and television productions were conceived and produced.

According to festival director Angelita Teo, SHF Takes Over! will open up spaces previously unexplored or inaccessible and bring festival goers closer with hidden tales and personal experiences of the site. She says, “This year, our new programme ‘SHF Takes Over!’ brings Singaporeans to Caldecott Broadcast Centre, a place that many of us are familiar with but few would have had the chance the visit. We hope that this experience will encourage our audiences to discover more about Singapore’s rich history and heritage, and to be inspired to contribute in their own way.”

SHF Takes Over! at Caldecott will span two weekends on 28 April – 1 May and 5 – 7 May 2017. For the full list of programmes, please visit http://heritagefestival.sg/programmes/all-caldecott-hill-programmes.

SHF Takes Over! at Caldecott will span two weekends on 28 April – 1 May and 5 – 7 May 2017. For the full list of programmes, please visit http://heritagefestival.sg/programmes/all-caldecott-hill-programmes.

SHF Takes Over! pays brief homage to Caldecott’s history beyond the broadcast centre. The hill where the latter sits on was named after Sir Andrew Caldecott, the Colonial Secretary of the Straits Settlements in the 1930s. The surrounding roads (Olive, Joan and John) were named after his wife and two children respectively. The hill was also home to crop fields and plantation houses, with large portions of the land owned by Seah Eu Chin, an early immigrant and prominent philanthropist who made his fortune in pepper and gambier trading in the 19th century.

The spotlight of the festival really, is on Caldecott as home to Mediacorp’s recently vacated headquarters. The festival takes place at the oldest part of Caldecott Broadcast Centre, where Radio-Television Singapore, Singapore’s first radio station, was set up. The TV50 Exhibition at Caldecott will take festival goers through the progress of Singapore’s broadcasting history and culture from the 1960s onwards.

A re-creation of a Kebun Baru’s Community Centre’s television watching communal area at the TV50 Exhibition. Shortly after the launch of Television Singapura on 15 February 1963 as Singapore’s first television station, people began to gather at communal spaces like the community centre to watch television.

A re-creation of a Kebun Baru Community Centre’s television watching communal area at the TV50 Exhibition. Shortly after the launch of Television Singapura on 15 February 1963 as Singapore’s first television station, people began to gather at communal spaces like the community centre to watch television.

By the 1980s, about 80% of the population had moved into high-rise HDB flats. More households were able to afford their own television set. The crowds which once gathered at communal spaces such as coffeeshops and community centres for their television fix dwindled.

By the 1980s, about 80% of the population had moved into high-rise HDB flats. More households were able to afford their own television set. The crowds which once gathered at communal spaces such as coffeeshops and community centres for their television fix dwindled.

: Creative director, Christie Chua, at the video installation, “From Aksi Mat Yoyo to The Awakening and back again” at the entrance of the TV50 Exhibition. Created by Brian Gothong Tan, the installation consists of cathode ray TV sets screening snippets from well-loved dramas, sitcoms and news programmes spanning 30 years.

Creative director, Christie Chua, at the video installation, “From Aksi Mat Yoyo to The Awakening and back again” at the entrance of the TV50 Exhibition. Created by Brian Gothong Tan, the installation consists of cathode ray TV sets screening snippets from well-loved dramas, sitcoms and news programmes spanning 30 years.

Festival goers can walk down memory lane on this 1960s-inspired film set.

Festival goers can walk down memory lane on this 1960s-inspired film set.

It is fitting that theatre takes centerstage in this SHF Takes Over! at Caldecott. After all, song and dance, theatre and acting, are key components of broadcast.

It is fitting that theatre takes centerstage in this SHF Takes Over! at Caldecott. After all, song and dance, theatre and acting, are key components of broadcast.

Local theatre group How Drama’s and their act, Fat Kids Are Harder To Kidnap. Their wacky take on current affairs and Singapore’s broadcast history are presented in 20 fast-paced plays in 30 minutes.

Local theatre group How Drama’s and their act, Fat Kids Are Harder To Kidnap. Their wacky take on current affairs and Singapore’s broadcast history are presented in 20 fast-paced plays in 30 minutes.

Cake Theatrical Productions’s Sweet Tooth presents Studio 6, a lively act with fast choreographed movements, dances to classic television jingles of the 1980s and 1990s, and humourous sketches of familiar scenes from popular television programmes such as Growing Up, The Little Nonya and Aiyoyo Laoshi.

Cake Theatrical Productions’ Sweet Tooth presents Studio 6, a lively act with fast choreographed movements, dances to classic television jingles of the 1980s and 1990s, and humourous sketches of familiar scenes from popular television programmes such as Growing Up, The Little Nonya and Aiyoyo Laoshi.

Sweet Tooth with a scene that pays tribute to Singapore’s most successful English drama series to date, Phua Chua Kang Pte Ltd. The series is Mediacorp’s longest running sitcom, spanning eight seasons from 1997 to 2007 with 167 episodes. It also won the Best Comedy Programme at the Asian Television Awards for six consecutive years from 1998 to 2003. The series endured despite early criticism from the government for its heavy usage of Singlish.

Sweet Tooth with a scene that pays tribute to Singapore’s most successful English drama series to date, Phua Chua Kang Pte Ltd. The series is Mediacorp’s longest running sitcom, spanning eight seasons from 1997 to 2007 with 167 episodes. It also won the Best Comedy Programme at the Asian Television Awards for six consecutive years from 1998 to 2003. The series endured despite early criticism from the government for its heavy usage of Singlish.


Launched in 2004 and currently in its 14th year, the Singapore Heritage Festival has offered Singaporeans a platform to explore and discover lesser-known aspects of Singapore’s heritage and culture through specially curated exhibitions, heritage trails, open houses and more. Singapore Heritage Festival 2017 spans three weekends from 28 April to 14 May 2017 and features more than 110 programmes. For more information on the Singapore Heritage Festival 2017, please visit http://heritagefestival.sg/.


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